Nature

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Decades ago, while Philip H. Lieberman was soaking in a bathtub and listening to the radio, he heard anthropologist Loren Eiseley ponder an evolutionary puzzle: Why couldn’t monkeys talk? Like us, they’re social primates, intelligent and certainly not quiet. Rhesus macaques grunt, coo, screech and scream. Infant macaques make sounds known as geckers.   Despite the grunting and geckering, though, no
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Species that share similar kinds of brain anatomy have been caught using different neural circuits to perform identical behaviours, and it challenges a basic assumption on the relationship between behaviour and neurology. The team is yet to figure out why this strange overlap exists among species, but the discovery points to how important behaviours can be
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Before being assembled into something recognisable at a museum, most dinosaur fossils look to the casual observer like nothing more than common rocks. No one, however, would confuse the over 110 million-year-old nodosaur fossil for a stone. The fossil, being unveiled today in Canada’s Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, is so well preserved it looks like
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Hey, kids: Science can be sexy – super sexy. Just ask Dara Orbach, who has spent seven years studying dolphin vaginas, and her colleagues Patricia Brennan and Diane Kelly, who are some of the foremost experts on animal penises. They recently combined forces to solve the mystery of just how dolphins and other cetaceans do the deed, a task that