Month: January 2018

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In the local people’s tongue, her name means ‘sunrise girl-child’, and even though she only lived for six fleeting weeks, she’s already told scientists more than we ever knew about the very first Native Americans.   Sunrise girl-child (“Xach’itee’aanenh T’eede Gaay”) lived some 11,500 years ago in what is now called Alaska, and her ancient
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As we get older, learning something new becomes more complex, tedious, and time-consuming than ever, and those child geniuses who can speak five different languages become our favourite dinnertime conversation, because how do they even do that?   But mastering unfamiliar subjects, whether you’re still in school or not, doesn’t have to be so painful.
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Black hole scientists sure have been busy. At the end of last year, researchers announced that the powerful winds emanating from supermassive black holes shape entire galaxies.   Now, a new research paper has found the first observational evidence that supermassive black holes actually control the mysterious process of star formation in their galaxies. At the
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Russia has conceded that a high-profile space failure in November last year occurred because scientists programmed a rocket carrying a US$45 million weather satellite with the wrong coordinates.   In comments to Russian state TV last week, deputy prime minister Dmitry Rogozin admitted the Meteor-M weather satellite was effectively under the impression it had launched
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There’s no easy way to rate dog intelligence. As canine psychologist Stanley Coren wrote back in the ’90s, there’s adaptive intelligence (i.e., figuring stuff out), working intelligence (i.e. following orders), and instinctive intelligence (i.e. innate talent) – not to mention spatial intelligence, kinesthetic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, and more.   Indeed, as animal behaviourist Frans de Waal