Month: November 2017

0 Comments
The first asteroid observed visiting our Solar System from elsewhere isn’t just unusual in its interstellar origin. It’s also unlike any other asteroid we’ve seen before. Astronomers have trained a flurry of telescopes on the object discovered last month, and now we’re being rewarded with super-exciting details.   Newly named ‘Oumuamua, the asteroid is up
0 Comments
This is an excerpt from Macquarie University’s Tackling Global Challenges magazine. Read the full magazine here. Oceans are fundamental to life on Earth: they regulate our climate, support countless marine species and sustain billions of people. They are also surprisingly fragile and unknown, and that’s where Macquarie University is making a splash.   “Students often
0 Comments
When the New Horizons spacecraft arrived at Pluto in 2015, the probe revealed the dwarf planet’s true nature: Pluto is a frozen lump, sure, but it is an odd and interesting lump.  Pluto has a heart-shaped icecap that, in theory, could hide an ocean. For no obvious reason, Pluto spits out X-rays. And when New Horizons took Pluto’s temperature, the dwarf planet
0 Comments
In the science of quantum communication, the challenge has always been prolonging the entangled state that the particles are in. As quantum information is carried by these entangled particles, the length of time the entanglement is sustained affects the distance that the information can travel.   Quantum communication systems do this using direct optical-fiber connections,
0 Comments
Using data from two different satellites, astronomers have linked an eerie-sounding phenomenon called a whistler mode chorus to sudden bursts of electrons in the magnetosphere.  Every now and then, the drizzle of charged particles that seeps through Earth’s protective magnetic shell erupts into a sudden downpour. Researchers have had their suspicions as to the cause, and