Month: August 2017

0 Comments
A team of scientists led by Mario Sucerquia at the University of Antioquia in Colombia have suggested a new explanation for the irregular dips in brightness of the star K8462852, since it recently resumed its unusual behaviour.  The mysterious shift in stellar opacity could be the signature of a transiting Saturn-like exoplanet.   “[W]e study the dynamics of a tilted exoring […] to
0 Comments
Controversy around the Dakota Access Pipeline continues with the latest news that the company behind the oil pipeline is now suing Greenpeace and other environmental groups who were involved in extensive protests against the project. On Tuesday, Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) filed a federal lawsuit, alleging the dissemination of “materially false and misleading information” about
0 Comments
A comprehensive analysis of almost 40 years’ worth of ExxonMobil communications has found that the company consistently misled the public on the mechanisms of climate change. In a new peer-reviewed study investigating nearly 200 climate change documents from the oil and gas giant, researchers discovered a damning discrepancy between what the company internally acknowledged versus
0 Comments
In an effort to improve the efficiency of natural photosynthesis, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, has created cyborg bacteria. These bacteria were trained to grow and cover their bodies with tiny semiconductor nanocrystals that act as efficient solar panels for harvesting sunlight.   Although most life on Earth relies upon photosynthesis as
0 Comments
Electrons have been caught flowing through graphene like a liquid, reaching limits physicists thought were fundamentally impossible. This type of conductance is known as ‘superballistic’ flow, and this new experiment suggests it could revolutionise the way we conduct electricity.   If that’s not crazy enough, the super-fast flows actually occur as a result of electrons
0 Comments
If you think the weather’s bad on our planet, consider the ice giants Neptune and Uranus, where intense pressures and super-hot temperatures are thought to cause cascading showers of diamonds. Now, researchers have recreated the effect here on Earth. Using high-powered optical lasers to rapidly heat polystyrene, researchers were able to produce and then study