Month: May 2017

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1. Lungs don’t just facilitate respiration – they also make blood. Mammalian lungs produce more than 10 million platelets (tiny blood cells) per hour, which equates to the majority of platelets circulating the body. 2. It is mathematically possible to build an actual time machine – what’s holding us back is finding materials that can physically
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For the first time, Chinese engineers have successfully extracted natural gas from icy deposits beneath the South China Sea. Just last year, China’s government announced that geologists had found new reserves of methane hydrate – also known as ‘flammable ice’ – and now it looks like they’ve managed to harvest some of it, bringing the world
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For the first time, physicists have demonstrated that a universe like ours with three spatial dimensions could actually host a naked singularity – an event so intense, the laws of physics would fall apart. Until now, researchers have only been able to place naked singularities in five-dimensional universes, but by proving that they could theoretically
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Researchers have constructed the world’s thinnest metallic nanowire, creating a stable string of the chemical element tellurium, that measures just one atom thick. The team behind the nanowire says the material is the most precisely configured ‘one-dimensional‘ system yet, and the technique used to produce the one-atom-thick atomic chain could lead to new advances in
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On 13 May 2017, California smashed through another renewable energy milestone as its largest grid, controlled by the California Independent System Operator (CISO), got 67.2 percent of its energy from renewables – not including hydropower or rooftop solar arrays. Adding hydropower facilities into the mix, the total was 80.7 percent. Sunny days with plenty of wind
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The first direct detection of gravitational waves, a phenomenon predicted by Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity, was reported by scientists in 2016. Armed with this “discovery of the century”, physicists around the world have been planning new and better detectors of gravitational waves.   Physicist Professor Chunnong Zhao and his recent PhD students Haixing
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It seems like it’s getting harder and harder to get a good night’s sleep. Myriad distractions are in cahoots, keeping you from getting enough shut-eye. We’re supposed to get seven to nine hours of sleep, but many Americans don’t hit that target every night. Sleep can provide incredible health benefits, like helping us lose weight, improving our memories, and even